Student Action Resources

There are so many ways for students to get involved with climate action! Here are some of the ways we suggest

1. Join or start a student activist group (either at the local or national level)

  • See below for more information on student groups

2. Stay informed on the latest news! Here are some resources that we recommend:

3. Make changes around your school

  • Advocate for sustainable changes, both small and large scale, through

4. Make changes around your home / your personal routine

  • Shop local
  • Shop second – hand
  • Adopt the 5 R’s of Sustainability as a practice – Refuse, Reduse, Reuse, Recycle, and Rot

5. Online Actions

6. Political Actions

Links to petitions links to websites that help you find and contact your representatives and politicians

Student Quotes

  • Students: What are your thoughts on global warming & climate change?
    • Send us an email at teach-climate@sustainlv.org.
    • (We’ll publish only your first name, but please include your name, grade, & school.)
    • Get new quotes from the new edition of Sustainable mag

Here are some current student’s thoughts on sustainability, climate change, and the current state of our world

  • “Climate change is no longer the boogeyman in the closet that we can hide away from. It’s time that we all prioritize its importance for the betterment of future generations.”  – Nate Stratton, Muhlenberg College 

  • “Nihilism is the enemy of progress, and it is a pit easy to fall into. Responsibility is a burden forced onto us, but it is one that we have no choice but to carry.”   – David F., CHARTS 

  • “Disregarding what’s occurring in our world is doing a disservice not only to crucial biomes but also to the health of humans. People will inevitably reap the implications of these negative responses through the lowered economic stability and environmental standards diminishing. Individuals must hold companies at fault accountable for their unethical working standards and normalize the production of sustainable alternations in conjunction with disenchanting consumerism. In order to have a prosperous future, it is imperative changes are put in place now and maintained long-term, or else there won’t be any more of our Earth for future generations to inherit.” – Alyson Van D., CHARTS 

  • “It is so easy to treat each other with kindness and compassion. Why not just let the old wounded ways die out and immediately begin treating animals, ecosystems, and our fellow humans with more gentleness?  We all suffer in life. Let’s not inflict any more pain upon each other but rather, help each other heal and coexist in peace.” – Rebecca C., Asbury, New Jersey 

  • “There is so much out there about climate change and environmental destruction, and a lot of it is depressing. What encourages me, through studying environmental science and studies, is the fact that ecosystems can be incredibly resilient, if we let them be. Working in union with natural systems is more effective than dominating them because it encourages the connections that interference damages. But there are certain things that are pretty irrecoverable. It’s been interesting to see that as a species we’re okay with letting them go. Climate change has revealed a lot about humanity to me; to see us forsake long-term self preservation, accept selfishness in the name of money, and to be so passive in its wake–these ideas shape me as I develop.  I’m hoping for a cultural, and political shift in my lifetime that considers the earth for what it is: inherently valuable, and interconnected with humans. I see environmental degradation as an inconspicuously, yet incredibly violent thing. I find that often people attribute environmentalism to idealism. I think it’s about being practical with our resources and spiritual state. If you feel like we’re screwed, I would urge you to consider that people are intensely affected by pollution and climate change now, and to seek some personal connection to nature. It’s about helping people and nature in our lifetime, and the future. It would be a shame to see us go extinct and take nature as it were alongside us, because it is avoidable. If I were to be passive about this issue it would be hard to respect myself, so I am trying to figure out how I can play a role in pushing this cultural shift as I get close to graduation.” – Kendall O., Lehigh University 

  • “Climate change is a dire issue that affects everyone on this planet; however, modern legislatures worldwide do not combat this rapidly growing issue appropriately. We have all of the resources and technology necessary to change the global climate for the better, so my generation and others must urgently push our lawmakers to take a firm stance against climate change and advocate for our future.”  – Harrison K., Parkland High School

  • “I can talk for hours about why climate change is important, the science behind it, and how we all have a role and responsibility to care for our Earth. My mindset on climate change is to view it as a personal challenge, rather than a distant trivial, and stagnant “Problem” which others can solve. We have so much power. Let’s work together to create practical and innovative blueprints to solve these multifaceted issues and then mindfully, turn them into reality! We need this to happen on a large scale but, a good place to start this journey is within your own communities. I have learned so much by attending local environmental advisory council meetings and it has shown me how local actions can contribute to solving these challenges one community at a time, ultimately growing the actions to larger-scale initiatives.  Together anything is possible!” – Lacey P., Muhlenberg College

  • “As a STEM student, I’m constantly reminded in my classes of how dire the climate crisis is and how it has the potential to become so much worse. The time to organize and demand change has to be now.” – Adin G., Muhlenberg College ’23

  • “I feel like we as a nation think that we can push climate change off for another few years, but we’ve gone past that point. It’s getting to the point of no return, so our political leaders need to formulate strong plans that will lead to tangible change.” – Olivia T., Muhlenberg College ’23

  • “It’s incredibly frustrating to see for myself the effects of climate change and to know that I am not even the one most affected by it. I’m disappointed in our leaders for not having higher on their agenda – we need working policies now.” – Eden C., Muhlenberg College ‘23

  • “Growing up I’ve seen the effects of climate change alter where I live. It’s depressing to see the deterioration of the places that I love. Political leaders must shift focus to climate change if we hope to substantially alter the path that we are on.” – Christine Z., Muhlenberg College ’23

  • “We need to stop ignoring climate change and take action. The world is dying every day and more people need to be informed about the ways that they can help prevent further damage: becoming vegan/ vegetarian, buying clothing from second-hand stores, using electric vehicles, etc.” – Claudia R., Moravian University, Newton NJ

  • “Many of the world’s leaders are failing to adequately address climate change since doing so involves putting their self-interests second to the good of the general populace. Until society makes it clear that it will not tolerate such brazen greed and cowardice, the atrocities leveled against nature and humankind will continue at the alarming rate we have observed for decades.” –   Hannah F., Moravian University

  • “ In a world currently fueled by hate and differing political views, we are struggling to come together as one team to address the problems we are currently facing regarding the future of our planet. To fix this, everyone has to become more open-minded and respectful to change the world for the greater good.” – Kalee A.

  • “The future is now. We as a class of 2021 are the future of the world. So we must prepare for that.” – Will C.

  • “People today are too scared to be wrong, admit mistakes, and be honest with each other. These traits do not lead to anything sustainable. I hope that new generations will be able to be open to each other and throw away preconceived notions and opinions.” – Anonymous